Former WWE Billy Jack Haynes IS accused of shooting and killing his 85-year-old wife then holding a two-hour standoff with police

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Former WWE star Billy Jack Haynes has been accused of shooting and killing his 85-year-old wife before an hours-long stand-off with the police. Haynes,

Former WWE star Billy Jack Haynes has been accused of shooting and killing his 85-year-old wife before an hours-long stand-off with the police.

Haynes, 70, whose real name is William Albert Haynes, was a fixture of the Portland wrestling scene and appeared at WrestleMania III.

It was a Morning on February 8

He is now suspected of killing his ‘angel’ wife, Janette Becraft, 85, on the morning of February 8 at his home in the Lents neighborhood of Portland, Oregon.

Tactical teams descended on the home after reports of a shooting but Haynes refused to leave the house, sparking a two-hour stand-off with cops.

Becraft Was Found Dead

He ‘eventually came out’ and was taken into custody – police then found Becraft shot dead inside the house.

Motive of Crime

No motive has been released for the alleged killing and formal charges have not yet been announced. 

Haynes had reportedly settled down at the house after he retired from wrestling. 

The Union of Haynes and Becraft

Becraft was the mother of another pro-wrestler, Tod Becraft, who fought under the name Tod Ruhl. 

Haynes and Tod were best friends and met when they were nine years old. When Becraft’s husband Dwight died, she married Haynes. 

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An obituary for Tod Becraft, who died in 2021, reads: ‘Billy Jack Haynes was Tod’s best friend. They met when Tod was nine years old. 

‘After Dwight passed away, Janette and Billy Jack married. Janette named her guinea pig Lil’ Todster, after her beloved son.’

Tributes

Becraft’s daughter, Kim Becraft Finlay, wrote on Facebook: ‘You are now flying with the Angels. They are lucky to have such a beautiful soul. Love you Mom.’ 

Her niece, Sue Becraft, wrote: ‘When a family member is murdered, as my Aunt Jan was this past Thursday morning in Portland, all that comes flooding back is the endless work her daughter did to get her away from her abuser. 

‘Hearing the pain and heartbreak in her voice as she tells me “He shot her this morning, she didn’t make it”.

‘She loved her mother deeply and did all she could, but services she called to help her, only failed her and Jan.’